Skip to content

Arrival at Premer

  • by

Getting on the road fairly early we left the tiny town of Wallabadah and headed for Quirindi.

Neither of us had ever heard of Quirindi so we were surprised when we found this wonderful town just a short drive from Wallabadah.

Like many small country towns Quirindi is a blend of present and the past. There’s a large supermarket, coffee shops and all the conveniences of today’s commercial world but there’s also a snapshot of the towns past in its well preserved old buildings and its proliferation of older cottages and houses. The town is bustling and busy and has the look and feel of a prosperous and extremely well looked after town. Colour is splashed throughout the town centre in the abundant manicured flower beds and the beautiful trees that line the streets.

We parked up and wandered around the town deciding that we’d liked to have stayed here a while had we known it was so pretty and appealing.

Heading out of the town we came upon a steep hill that led to the “Who’d a Thought It” Lookout.

How spectacular is this place!

The changing colours of the fields below.

The changing colours of the fields below.

 

Over looking Quirindi

Over looking Quirindi

 

"Who'd a thought it". Great name for the lookout.

“Who’d a thought it”. Great name for the lookout.

You can see 360 degree views of the vast fertile Liverpool plains sweeping to the magnificent Warrumbungle Ranges far in the distance. What a sight!

Back on the road again, this time on the Kamilaroi Highway, we passed the most beautiful rural landscapes with almost every property fastidiously maintained and tidy.

We turned off the highway onto the small Quirindi – Coonabarabran back road and travelled the 80 kilometres to Premer.

As is usual for these back roads we found a treasure trove of scenery.

A Peregrine Eagle sweeping across our path made us think that it wasn’t used to seeing that many cars. We passed picture perfect farm houses with surrounding verandas, hay barns and still working windmills.

Huge cornfields lined the roads and as we stopped to listen the wind rustled the tops of a million corn plants in a magical symphony of sound.

Corn fields lined the road.

Corn fields lined the road.

As we travel these byways there’s always the anticipation of wondering what’s over the next hill. In one instance a hill crest provided us with a view of a huge section of the Liverpool plains that appeared as if a perfect pure yellow blanket had been cast over it. It was a farm of Sunflowers that would be ready to harvest by early April creating a spectacular colour combination of sunflowers, blue sky and green rolling hills.

Fields bright yellow with Sunflowers.

Fields bright yellow with Sunflowers.

Old farmhouses gave the appearance of an area that time had forgotten.

Old houses stil standing.

Old houses stil standing.

 

Goats now live here.

Goats now live here.

 

What stories could they tell.

What stories could they tell.

Eventually we pulled in to the tiny town of Premer.


View Larger Map
There are only a few houses here, a pub a small Post Office, a school and a sports field

There are also some large grain silos on the railway track, a centre for the shipping of the harvested grain from the farms in the area.

There’s also a wonderful camping area that has power and water available. There are also toilets and hot showers. It’s not free as its run by the local Lions Club and they ask for a donation to ensure its upkeep but it’s a great spot.

It looks out over large farms surrounded by hills in the distance and is superbly quiet and peaceful.

Here we met Geoff and Sandra who make the most amazing camp ovens which they sell from their caravan.

We’ll stay here for a couple of days and get some work done.

Join the conversation